Lamar

Lamar

19-01-2022

13:21

Do you write? 5 years ago I paid $1650 to learn the same framework Hollywood uses to script movies—and I've made that back 200x over. Here it is. 🤫 Thread. ⬇️

Story is the most persuasive messaging tool in the universe. But most story gurus teach a small portion of it. So...

Here's a 23-part framework you can use for clear and concise messaging. I rarely use the whole thing. Still...

Everything I write derives from this 1 framework: ✅Threads ✅Landing pages ✅Long sales pages ✅And that one time I ghostwrote a children's book. Let's go. First...

1. The Controlling Idea What are you trying to prove? This is the most important step. Because...

Without a controlling idea... Both you and your audience will get confused.

2. Introduce the Main Character Who is this story about? Then...

3. Describe the Stable World Everything's good until it's not. Show us that goodness. Next...

4. Destabilize The World Stories are built on problems. Here's where an inciting event happens. And the big problem is introduced.

5. Agitate The Problem That one big event causes a chain of others. Show us the domino effect. And when the world is completely destabilized...

Define 3 levels of the problem: 6. The Surface Problem 7. The Deep Problem 8. The Big-picture Problem Here's an example...

Surface: I weighed 257 pounds and had a mild heart attack. Deeper: I felt hopeless. Big-picture: My 1yo son shouldn't have to pay a price for the state of my health. (Based on a true story.) Now...

9. Introduce the Threat 'Threat' means any destructive force: •A comet •A tornado •A virus Or...

A person. AKA the villain. So by this point...

We have all the makings of a great story: •A deep problem •The source of the problem. •And someone to solve it. Now...

10. State The Theme Not to be confused with the controlling idea—which is what this story is trying to PROVE...

The theme is principle: What's this story ABOUT? Love? Connection? Truth? Hope? Next...

11. Define The Stakes What happens if this problem (all 3 levels of it) isn't solved? And then throw in some urgency. How?

A time limit. Be creative here: •Get to the boat before sunrise •Say something before she leaves •Prepare for the big threat's arrival. Then...

12. Foreshadow The Climactic Scene The main character will have to address the threat eventually. What will that look like? Next...

13. Introduce The Guide The main character isn't competent enough to do this alone. But the guide has done it before—to some extent.

Examples: •Gandolf (Lord of the Rings) •Rocky (Creed) •Maui (Moana) •Iron Man (Spiderman: Homecoming) Then...

14. Explain The Plan How must the problem be solved? Make us feel the weight of it. It should feel impossible to solve. Next...

15. Define The Call To Action The main character is willing but reluctant. They know what to do. But...

They don't want to do it. Because it'll cost them something. So who or what will force them to take action right now?

16. Repeat The Stakes Most of the story is the plan being executed. Along the way...

The main character will experience setbacks. Remind them (and us) of the stakes to keep them going.

17. Unleash the Threat Here's where we see its full force.

And it's strong. Too strong for the main character. This leads us to...

18. The All-is-lost Moment The situation is hopeless. And the main character is ready to give up. Until...

19. The Hinge Decision Once again the main character is reminded not only of the stakes...

But also of how far they've come. They're not the same person they were at the start.

And they find their resolve. "Whatever it takes."

20. Deus Ex Machina Unexpected help arrives. And it gifts...

The grace to prevail. The main character gets another chance. Then...

21. The Obligatory Scene Where the main character faces the threat head-on. For example...

The events here lead up to: •The final blow. •The pressing of the red button that blows up the meteor. •Talking down the flaming lava monster. Finally...

22. The Resolution Of Subplots We tie up any loose ends here—and give any supporting characters a proper sendoff. And then wrap up the story with...

23. The Theme Repeated What was this story about again? Also...

Did you prove your controlling idea (which has likely evolved along the way)? If you did—then...

Boom. You got yourself a story. Now...

You can play with the order. And—unless you write... •Books •Sales pages •or Scripts...

You won't need all of this. But keep in mind...

There's more to it. And there's LOTS of nuance to this—depending on what you're using it for. So...

Follow me to learn more about the most powerful & most persuasive messaging framework in the universe - @ElevatedStory Plus...

Homage to: •Bernadette Jiwa •Michael Hauge •Christopher Booker One more thing...

Remember—I dropped $1650 on this. But it cost you nothing. All I ask is...

Retweet the first tweet... (Down there 👇) And I will DM you the TLDR checklist. Might take a while so make sure you keep the RT up. That way I won't miss you. 🥂


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